Photoset

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

Photo
Home. I missed this.

Home. I missed this.

Photo
This is what happens when  you see yourself on SYTYCD, I know the feeling.

This is what happens when you see yourself on SYTYCD, I know the feeling.

Video

So beautiful. How I’ve missed it here.

(Source: 99percentinvisible)

Photo
Woke up next to a beautiful woman. Got to hang with a good friend on the way to the airport, now home. Truly grateful.

Woke up next to a beautiful woman. Got to hang with a good friend on the way to the airport, now home. Truly grateful.

Quote
"You can’t find intimacy—you can’t find home—when you’re always hiding behind masks. Intimacy requires a certain level of vulnerability. It requires a certain level of you exposing your fragmented, contradictory self to someone else. You running the risk of having your core self rejected and hurt and misunderstood."

— Junot Díaz 

(Source: , via america-wakiewakie)

Quote
"Assimilationists want nothing less than to construct the homosexual as normal - white, monogamous, wealthy, 2.5 children, SUVs with a white picket fence. This construction, of course, reproduces the stability of heterosexuality, whiteness, patriarchy, the gender binary, and capitalism itself. If we genuinely want to make ruins of this totality, we need to make a break. We don’t need inclusion into marriage, the military, and the state. We need to end them. No more gay politicians, CEOs, and cops. We need to swiftly and immediately articulate a wide gulf between the politics of assimilation and the struggle for liberation. We need to rediscover our riotous inheritance as queer anarchists. We need to destroy constructions of normalcy, and create instead a position based in our alienation from this normalcy, and one capable of dismantling it."

Toward The Queerest Insurrection  (via faggotviolence)

Yes, and YES.

(Source: vileprince, via projectqueer)

Photo
Be aware.

Be aware.

Quote
"Love your life and it most certainly will love you back!"

— true story.

(Source: thetaoofdana)

Photoset

whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"

-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)

This is a link to a PDF of the zine if you want to print a copy yourself!

(via thepeoplesrecord)

Photoset

Beauty.

(Source: thelibertineezine.com, via nevver)

Quote
"It is reported that Maya Angelou has likened racial microaggressions or petty humiliations to “small murders,” in contrast to the blatant forms of oppressions called “grand executions,” in which the lethal nature of biased acts is obvious (Greene, 2000). Microaggressions have the lifelong insidious effects of silencing, invalidating, and humiliating the identity and/or voices of those who are oppressed. Although their lethality is less obvious, they nevertheless grind down and wear out the victims.

Studies reveal that a lifetime of microaggressions takes a major toll on the psychological functioning of marginalized groups in our society (Constantine & Sue, 2007; Crocker & Major, 1989; Herek, Gillis, & Cogan, 2009; Lyness & Thompson, 2000; National Academies, 2006; Pierce, 1978, 1988, 1995; Salvatore & Shelton, 2007; Solórzano et al., 2000; Steele, Spencer, & Aronson, 2002; Symanski, 2009). When speaking about the Black experience, for example, microaggressions have been described as “offensive mechanisms used against blacks”; they are “often innocuous,” but the “cumulative weight of their never-ending burden” may result in “diminished mortality, augmented morbidity, and flattened confidence” (Pierce, Carew, Pierce-Gonzalez, & Willis, 1978)."

— Derald Wing Sue, Microaggressions in Everyday Life (via wretchedoftheearth)

(via thepeoplesrecord)

Photoset

#burninggoldvideo

http://youtu.be/-aNxhQKAXxE

Best Yet.

(Source: christinaupdates, via christinaperriblogs)

Photo
cartoonpolitics:

"I have always found it quaint and rather touching that there is a movement [Libertarians] in the US that thinks Americans are not yet selfish enough." .. (Christopher Hitchens)

Ha

cartoonpolitics:

"I have always found it quaint and rather touching that there is a movement [Libertarians] in the US that thinks Americans are not yet selfish enough." .. (Christopher Hitchens)

Ha

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via satanic-capitalist)

Quote
"I will stay gentle
no matter what I endure,
I am so much more."

(Source: tylerknott.com, via emmaleaton)