Photo
reportagebygettyimages:

The August issue of National Geographic magazine looks at the “New Face of Hunger" in the U.S.:

The number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

For the article, National Geographic assigned Reportage contributor Kitra Cahana to photograph what food insecurity looks like in the suburbs of Houston, Texas. In the image above, Jacqueline Christian, a home health aide and mother of two in the Houston suburb of Spring, says grace before a lunch of supermarket sushi. With a full-time job that requires constant driving, Christian often buys takeout meals. When food runs out, she picks up dinner for her sons from McDonald’s dollar menu and tells the boys she’s already eaten, “just hoping they leave a piece of the burger.”
Read an interview with Kitra and see more of her photos on National Geographic’s Proof blog.
(Photos by Kitra Cahana/National Geographic)

reportagebygettyimages:

The August issue of National Geographic magazine looks at the “New Face of Hunger" in the U.S.:

The number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

For the article, National Geographic assigned Reportage contributor Kitra Cahana to photograph what food insecurity looks like in the suburbs of Houston, Texas. In the image above, Jacqueline Christian, a home health aide and mother of two in the Houston suburb of Spring, says grace before a lunch of supermarket sushi. With a full-time job that requires constant driving, Christian often buys takeout meals. When food runs out, she picks up dinner for her sons from McDonald’s dollar menu and tells the boys she’s already eaten, “just hoping they leave a piece of the burger.”

Read an interview with Kitra and see more of her photos on National Geographic’s Proof blog.

(Photos by Kitra Cahana/National Geographic)

Photo
christinaperriblogs:

2 days. #burninggoldvideo. vh1music

christinaperriblogs:

2 days. #burninggoldvideo. vh1music

Photo
Photoset

Yes.

(Source: micdotcom)

Photoset

wetheurban:

DESIGN: The Coffee-Making Alarm Clock

We need this because reasons. This one’s for the coffee drinkers amongst you - British designer Joshua Renouf has come up with a coffee making alarm clock which can wake you up with a fresh cup of joe.

Read More

Need.

Photo
adbusters:

Eric Yahnker
Photoset

all the things

(Source: kotaku.com, via nevver)

Photo
Photoset

(Source: dazeddigital.com, via nevver)

Photoset
Text

When murder is doubly bound

The murder of innocents can lead one to be caught in a double bind. Killing is bad. This is one of the most basic principles of almost any religion, and typically the starting point of morality itself. Killing innocent people is less permissible than killing guilty people, and killing innocent women and children is the worst kind of killing. Whatever our personal opinion of this value judgment, it seems to be a generally agreed upon principle. However, I have learned this month, it is not an immutable one, context matters. If I speak of the murder of innocent women and children in Palestine many people would call me anti-Semitic. It’s phenomenal how history and emotion can operate to disfigure a universally accepted principle. In no other area of human endevour can the truth be manipulated in such a way. When representing physical form for example, a standard drawing of an object will remain that object, it doesn’t matter what other details accompany it, no color scheme will change the truth of what that drawing represents. Even context does not change the object itself, a drawing of a chair, for example, will always be a chair, whether it is at a table, standing alone, or turned upside down, the truth of what the rendition of that object represents will not change. Lately, it seems, that the sanctity of life of innocent children is not as clear of a principle.

I’m unsure why this particular injustice seems to grab my attention today. More innocent children have died at the hands of unscrupulous settlers on the stolen land I inhabit here in Canada. Children die unnecessarily every day in Los Angeles, where I grew up. We are surrounded by injustice, and drowning in contradictions. It is often said that everything is relative. I don’t think it is. My worst day will never be as bad as the worst day of my counterpart in Palestine. That’s not to say I don’t have bad days or my Palestinian counterpart good days. Or that those days should not be acknowledged for what they are. For me to even write about this is presumptuous and probably myopic. Sometimes I feel powerless, almost like a child, begging daddy’s permission to speak, to act, to try to do some good. Feeling bound doesn’t even begin to describe it.

For now I’ll be thinking about the definition of double bind:

A double bind is an emotionally distressing  dilemma in communication in which an individual (or group) receives two or more conflicting messages, and one message negates the other. This creates a situation in which a successful response to one message results in a failed response to the other (and vice versa), so that the person will automatically be wrong regardless of response. The double bind occurs when the person cannot confront the inherent dilemma, and therefore can neither resolve it nor opt out of the situation.

    

Photo
 
Photoset

lezbeyan:

Femme Nation: A photo series by 16 year old Hailey Corrall to provoke a message about misogyny in our youth.

(via loveandlifeinthebay)

Photo
 
Link